Each year, with New Years Day, comes the daunting task of creating a resolution or resolutions. Countless times in the past, we have observed others and ourselves direct our short term focus with aspirations for creating change. As we often embark on that journey, we find ourselves at a week or two in and are struggling to keep our energy, enthusiasm and excitement at levels that will keep us on track. Has this happened to you? Why does this happen? How can I escape the loop?

Zen Planner a company that creates software solutions for aspiring gym owners / communities suggests that on average, gym memberships spike 18% in the month of January. These new members take to the treadmills, elliptical machines and sign-up for classes like a person with great resolve, destined to make change. Despite this seemingly positive trend, most of these new memberships become nothing more than a casual acquaintance after just a couple of weeks.

source: ZenPlanner

“However, studies show most people ditch the fitness resolutions after just 14 days.”

according to Claire Rick of KXAN
https://www.kxan.com/news/local/austin/gym-memberships-spike-and-then-sharply-decline-after-new-year/995033328

Dictionary.com suggests Resolutions is a firm decision to do or not to do something.  So does this mean that after ~14 days, we are no longer firm in our resolutions / aspirations? I posit that the problem occurs / exists in the latter half of the definition – to do or not to do something. As modern human beings we want immediate results (instant gratification), and when we don’t realize those immediate results – we get discouraged, we talk ourselves out of those resolutions (compromising firm) and stop doing – stop taking action. The minute we stop taking action, we stop making progress and we are destined for a seemingly comfortable, complacent New Year that looks a lot like years past.

“To combat complacency, and remain steadfast in your firm decisions, we must approach these oft faulty resolutions with more strategic focus and a tactical response geared towards refining / optimizing behaviors one choice / action at a time.”

Jonathan Faria

Recently, I have been working on a series of projects with the intent of helping individuals and teams optimize their performance. Through years of experience and plenty of trial and error, I firmly believe there is a simple framework to making / sustaining change.

For this entry, I will provide a high level overview of the framework for the program. *Please note, although the framework alone is a big piece of the puzzle, there are other implements used to optimize this framework and generate / sustain change.*

There are 3 stages within the framework

Step 1: Identifying / building beliefs (Developing your Why)

  • Understanding your landscape (existing / desired behavior analysis)

Step 2: Establishing and implementing healthy behaviors that are aligned with your “Why”

  • Creating support systems that reduce drag and improve decision making
  • Learning and development (theory and practical learning exercises)
  • Plan implementation

Step 3: Accountability, analysis and sustainment

  • How to measure success and building a culture for accountability

This framework is extremely simple when mapped correctly. Change can often feel overly complex and difficult. This program takes a client through the entire lifecycle while offering accountability, encouragement and support throughout the change journey.

If you would like more information please email Jonathan at Jfaria26@comcast.net